What Generation Are You?

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    Generational Harmony Comes from Active Generational Engagement

    What generation are you?  Do you know? The Baby Boomer Generation is typically defined as those born in or between the years 1946-1964.  We’re searching for some of the best explanations of the generations to include here at Best Boomers and Beyond, and this one is from TheWire.com.

    NOTE:

    EDITOR’S NOTE:  We like to share others articles that may be interesting or helpful, though we may not necessarily agree with all of the opinions, perspectives, or conclusions of the article’s author. Our goal is to be inclusive and not political or biased, other than to have a bias toward all things that are energizing, elevating, educative, and empowering.

    Some sources offer different timelines for the generations, such as this one from Pew Research Center.

    ARTICLE from THE WIRE

    TheWire.com identified six different generations, and labeled their eras.

    Greatest Generation. These are the people that fought and died in World War II for our freedom, which we appreciate. But it’s a little over-the-top as far as names go, isn’t it? Tom Brokaw made the name up [when he titled his book The Greatest Generation], and of course everyone loved it. What, you’re going to argue with your grandfather that he isn’t in the greatest generation? The generation ended when the war ended.

    Baby Boomers. This is the agreed-upon generation that falls within DiPrete’s punctuated timeframe. It began when the Greatest Generation got home and started having sex with everyone; it ended when having sex with everyone was made easier with The Pill.

    Generation X. George Masnick, author of The Nation’s Families: 1960-1990, and of the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies, puts this generation in the time frame of 1965 to 1984, in part because it’s a neat 20-year period. He also calls it the “baby bust,” mocking “[p]undits on Madison Avenue and in the media” that call it Generation X.

    Generation Y. Masnick addresses this group, too, putting it “anywhere from the mid-1970s when the oldest were born to the mid-2000s when the youngest were.” But mostly Generation Y is a made-up generation when it became obvious that young kids didn’t really fit with the cool Generation X aesthetic but not enough of them had been born to make a new generation designation. NOTE: Generation Y is a fake, made-up thing. Do not worry about it.
    [BB&B Editors Note:  Some would disagree with this assessment, such as this clear summation from The Social Librarian].

    Millennials. In October 2004, researchers Neil Howe and William Strauss called Millennials “the next great generation,” which is funny. They define the group as “those born in 1982 and approximately the 20 years thereafter.” In 2012, they affixed the end point as 2004.

    TBD. But that means that kids born in the last 10 years lack a designation. They are not Millennials. Earlier this month, Pew Research asked people what the group should be called… [so] this is the new Generation Y. We’ll figure out what they’re called in the future.

    Here, we made a helpful chart.

    Baby Boomers, Best Boomers And Beyond, Generation Y, Generation X, Generation Z, Generation Millenials, The Greatest Generation, Baby Boomer Generation, Generations,
    Generation Chart from The Wire

    The experts say the media get to determine when generations happen.

    EDITOR’S NOTE:  Well, we—the people—are the media today.  We are the consumers, the market and the creators.  And we Boomers also get to say how the story of our generation ends up.  What do you say that we go out having a blast while making a powerfully positive dent in the universe?!  After all, the legendary Steve Jobs, was a Baby Boomer who did just that.

     

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